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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  January 13, 2015 9:00am-10:01am EST

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this is bbc america. and now, live from london "bbc world news." the concluding moments of a one-hour ceremony a service of remembrance in the prefecture of paris dedicated by francois hollande, the french president to the three police officers who were killed in the course of the extraordinary and tragic events in paris last week. the three police officers john felipe a 26-year-old
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policewoman, a french muslim and frank, nearly 30 years serving in the force. the officer who was killed in his duty of trying to protect the staff at charlie hebdo magazine. these scenes have been taking place at the same time as the funerals of the four victims of the kosher supermarket hostage taking and killings carried out, of course also in paris in the midst of those frenzied extraordinary days. our paris correspondent has been watching and listening to the words of the french president trying to strike a balance between the importance of maintaining a sense of calmness serenity he says.
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let's not jump into decisions too soon maintaining unity and expressing the sense of gratitude, as much as anything else to the officers who died during their duty. >> in saying that he expresses the feelings of the nation the gratitude that the french people feel toward that police, is at a real high now. you can see that. i was at the supermarket a day or two after the killings there and there were motorists going by honking horns, thumbs up waving thanking police officers who were at the scene because there's a general sense that the sacrifice of these three and the performance of the professional elite that went in and they knew more of the two sieges was something that makes the nation very very proud. a gratitude indeed.
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as i said before gratitude for the keyword to sacrifice. when you draw in the police you know that there's a chance of sacrifice. these were lone people. jean felipe 26 years old. always wanted to join the police, went to police school and just graduated, learned she graduated and was doing the most ordinary work on the streets. a silly road accident and there she was. it may be, and you alluded to it. being there, she may have saved lives. she may have distract eded cool bally. that sacrifice, at a time a country feels it is at war and
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some kind of confrontation with forces it doesn't really understand. >> many better examples of what it can be used for. the highest honor in the land to be given to people who have done the most for the country, which we have been witnessing in the course of this service. >> indeed. indeed, that's right. it is handed out. there are many people who get it. obscure people who have worked their way up in different fields. it can and must be handed out to ordinary people who have done just extraordinary things in such a symbolic way. >> thanks very much indeed. the pictures from the prefecture, the home of course of the paris police the
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national police force with 30,000 personnel have their headquarters. we have lost those pictures now. we have been seeing scenes from jerusalem as well as the funerals have been taking place and still are, as you can see here with the president and the prime minister for the four victims of that kosher supermarket killing that we heard from hugh. a french government minister if i'm right, addressing the congregation there. it is quite a congregation too. that service is continuing. well, let me recap a little bit. the three french police officers killed in the course of last week's terror attacks have been awarded frances very highest honor. the president, francois
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hollande. the last of three three, a muslim himself was shot to death by islamist gunman as he lay injured on the pavement following the attack on the offices of charlie hebdo. >> paid with his life an engagement. a french with mostly conviction was proud to represent french police. very public separatism which makes our countries that all faiths are respected, all religions are protected, all citizens there, religious or not, whether they believe or not, they should live together.
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always a victim. more than anybody else. islamist radicals have nothing to do with islam. radicalism kills muslim's. >> talking there a few monts ago. the funeral and ceremony continues in jerusalem as well. a short while ago, the prime minister betnetanyahu spoke. he was referring to the attacks a couple years ago now in which an islamist gunman attacked french jews there and referred to the islamic terror he called it as a threat to the peace of the world. he also said it was striking the heart of french jury in
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particular. as these four individual bodies are being brought back to israel for their funerals he also said that today, israel is the home of these people. it was their homecoming the lives of individuals cut down as he said by hatred and the attackers he described not just as enemies of the jewish people but as enemies of the world. also the leader of the opposition has been speaking. we are going to be speaking to our correspondent who is in jerusalem. she is being introduced to some of the family and friends of the victims of that attack in paris last week. we are going to come back in a moment for you on "bbc world news." let me just bring you up to date on the other news stories around the world.
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we start in egypt where the highest court in the land overturned the conviction of hosni mubarak for embezzlement and ordered a retrial. it was the only case keeping him in custody. all convictions are now dropped. last november they dropped charges of complicity in the killing of demonstrators in 2011 which swept him from power. our correspondent has been following developments from cairo. >> reporter: well, this ruling is another legal victory for egypt's former president hosni mubarak mubarak. he was sentenced last may with his two sons convicted of embezzling funds allocated for the resurrection of palaces. today, in court, when the ruling was announced, supporters were jup lent as they erupted in
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cheers and shouted in front of the court, holding posters of the former president in his younger day. for now, the former president has been serving his sentence in a military hospital on the banks of the nile. his lawyer told bbc after the hearing, when asked if he would be released he said god willing, god willing. no further detail has been provided. there was a report and one private newspaper suggesting the family would not try to have him released because they were concerned about providing security for him in a private residence. certainly the way is now open for hozsni mubarak. that's likely to provoke a reaction. >> the govern says forces killed 143 bowfighters.
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there's a statement that said one of their soldiers was killed, four wounded during five hours of fighting near the town of kolofata. it's close to nigeria. they threatened the president. the group has killed thousands of people in northeastern nigeria, of course. indonesian divers found the flight recorder of the airasia plane that crashed into the java sea. the flight data recorder was also recovered. it could take up to a year. we have more from jakarta. >> reporter: indonesia's transport minister looking through the wreckage of airasia plane as news was received of
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retrieving the second data machine. conversation of the pilot and co-pilot minutes before the crash. this is a break. officials found two vital parts of the wreckage that will piece together a picture of why the plane crashed. on monday the flight data recorder was retrieved from the depths of the java sea. both boxes will be sent to labs in indonesia for analysis. international investigators will be pitching in. >> translator: the black box will be saved and people not allowed to enter unless assigned fwi investigating team. it will remain in the container until we agree on the standard procedure to open it. >> reporter: the crash cost an ugly shadow on the growing airline industry. >> translator: the ministry and
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investigator must be open on the result of what went wrong. was it human error? it must be open to all. >> translator: first of all, security and safety as well as other aviation regulations must be enhanced. among the pilots retrained with an emphasis on safety. >> reporter: it's now been more than two weeks since the airasia plane plunged into the java sea killing all 162 people on board. the discovery of the black boxes will be a welcome development for relatives waiting for answers as to why the plane crashed and hopefully provide closure for these grieving familiar vis. bbc news jakarta. >> i'm bringing you back to the scenes live in jerusalem during the funeral services taking place for the four victims of the kosher supermarket killings
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in paris last week. we have heard from the prime minister, from the president, representative of the french government, the opposition leader in israel as well. we have been focusing to a large extent of what is going on simultaneously in paris. this is a good chance to catch up on remarks and scenes we have had in jerusalem, as well. our correspondent has been following that. perhaps you could bring us up to date on the remarks, in particular benjamin netanyahu. >> reporter: the ceremony is wrapping up. we had the israeli national anthem. we heard from religious and political leaders, among them the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu emphasizing israel was the home of the jewish people a place where they could take sanctuary. we heard from the israeli
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president who spoke about how he, himself, stood broken hearted, shaken and in pain. with me stands an entire nation. he talked about how he wished the four men could have come to israel alive. this is not how they were supposed to come home he said. of course these four men were not israeli citizens. they were french citizens and residents. an offer was made by the israeli foreign ministry for them to be buried here in jerusalem. all of the families took up that offer. just a reminder of who the four men were. a supermarket worker in his early 20s. another man in his early 20s. son of the chief rabbi who was a student in paris. also an i.t. executive in his 40s, a father of four and the oldest of them a retired father
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of two, in his 60s. now, very shortly, all four bodies will be taken by ambulance to the burial site. we are waiting for that to happen now. the crowd is just starting to dispurse behind me. it's been really a very moving event. we saw all the proper jewish rituals after the bodies were brought to israel from france just very early this morning. >> thanks very much indeed. the long walk to the burial of the four victims about to start there on the western part of jerusalem. you are watching "bbc world news." thanks for being with us and staying with us. still to come on the program, as armed police guard jewish buildings across fran we report from where there's painful memories.
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you are watching "bbc world news." i'm david eades. the latest headlines. the three police officers killed in last week's paris attacks have been given france's highest award. funerals are being held in israel for the jewish victims on the attack of a kosher supermarket in paris. let's catch up on the business news. erin is here with more on airasia. >> we are talking about the plane makers and the battle. let me explain. thanks, david. needless to say, 2014 was a horrible a tough year for the aviation industry. divers retrieve the cockpit voice recorder of the airasia jet that crashed in the java sea two weeks ago.
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they are working on jetable black boxes that can float, allowing them to be recovered more easily. today, they say they tipped boeing in terms of the number of orders they received. airbus is trailing boeing when it comes to deliveries. deliveries are important for the manufacturers. that's when they get paid. let's go straight to the source. john is chief operating officer. great to have you with us as always on the program. i want to talk about deliveries. they are important. why does boeing continue to tip you in terms of orders? some saboing is well ahead of you guys when it comes to managing and running its supply chain. do you have supply chain issues? >> well i wouldn't jump to that conclusion especially after the fiasco they had with the 787.
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they did deliver more aircraft this year than we did. not by a large amount, but they did more. if you go over the last ten years, we delivered more aircraft than they did. it swings back and forth. we flattened out production while we were getting our supply chain under control at higher levels of production. i think with higher order levels than they have over the next years, you will see us ramping up production you will see the aircraft behind me ramping up in production. i think that in terms of delivery, it will swing back in our direction in a few years. >> while i have you, i want to talk about lessons learned from last year. if there's one thing we learned, whether a boeing or air jet that crashes into the ocean, it's difficult to find. talk to us about the ejectable black boxes floating black
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boxes. >> well we all know about the black box, that is recording everything going on in the airplane before the accident or incident occurs. unfortunately, if the airplane goes down, it goes down with the wreckage. it's very hard to damage but the fact is if you are in two or three mile deep ocean, it's going to be at the bottom of two to three miles of water and you have to find it. we have come up with an idea which we think all airlines should adopt, which takes the black box. when the airplane gets into a critical situation outside the flight envelope it will eject the black box, recording everything that happened it floats on the surface of the ocean, very easy to recover. it's very important, in the interest of safety that we do recover it to find out what happened, what were the pilots doing? what was the weather do?
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what was the position of controls et cetera. >> given the incredible technology on board the jets like the one behind you. when an airline has an incident or a crash, is it not archaic we are talking about having to find a little box? i wonder why your planes or boeings don't feed that black box data live? the technology exists. the planes already talk to the ground during flight. why aren't we looking at that? >> we could look at that as well. there is an enormous amount of data flowing through all the airplanes around the world. you don't want to be recording everything happening on every airplane. you do bring up a good point, when it gets into a critical situation, key parts could be bounced off a satellite and recorded elsewhere. we think that would be a good idea as well. you really need all of that data and the idea of ejecting the
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black box with the reams and reams of data telling every detail about what's happening to the airplane what's happening to every instrument on the airplane, what's happening to the position of controls the power setting, what the pilots are saying back and forth to each other tharks is essential to understand what happens when you have an accident. we would recommend that first, but there's nothing wrong with transmitting data if that would help. >> okay. john, we appreciate your time. thank you very much. >> thank you. >> the coo of airbus. follow me on twitter, tweet me i'll tweet you back. b bbcerin. >> thanks very much for that. i want to bring you details of a major story. that is the court of appeal in egypt has overturned a three year sentence for former
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president mubarak. his conviction for embezzlement. for more on that we speak to sally, our correspondent in cairo. does that mean sally, that former president mubarak is now off the hook on all charges? >> yes, legally, yes. mubarak is a free man. all charges leveled against him over the past three years have been dropped now. the court overturned the three-year sentence issued against him last may and ordered a retrial in the embezzlement case. mubarak now is a free man. the fact that he will be released or not is still to be decided by the prosecution. there are lots of procedures to be taken and they may take time. mubarak is in a military hospital. they are quoting sources close to him to say he will remain there even if he is released. this is the safest place for him
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to stay right now. >> sally in cairo, thank you. just time for me to point out we have been watching simultaneous services both in jerusalem and paris. this is paris for the funerals of the three police officers killed in the course of last week's attacks. you are watching "bbc world news." [ male announcer ] fedex® has solutions to enable global commerce that can help your company grow steadily and quickly. great job. (mandarin) ♪ ♪ cut it out. >>see you tomorrow. ♪ ♪ you want an advanced degree, but sometimes work can get in the way. now capella university offers flexpath, a revolutionary new program that allows you to earn a degree at your pace and graduate at the speed of you.
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i'm daidvid eades with "bbc world news." paris has given the highest award, the legion of honor. >> translator: sunday france showed its strength. it showed its unity in the face of those who want to devid it. >> in israel funerals are under way for jewish victims on the attack of a kosher supermarket
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in paris. ♪ the former president, hosni mubarak could be releaseed from detention after his conviction of embezzlement is overturned. hello, thanks very much for being with us. these three french police officers killed in the terror attacks have been awarded frances highest honor. a solemn ceremony of remembrance has been taking place in paris attended by the french president and members of the cabinet. he said his country would never yield in the face of terror and paid tribute to the three
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officers officers. the last of these, a muslim himself was shot dead by islamist gunman. he laid injured on the pavement of the offices or charlie hebdo. >> translator: paid with his life and engagement. a french with muslim conviction was proud to represent french police. the values of the republic. the separatism which makes our countries that all fates are respected, all religions are protected, all citizens were there, religious or not, whether they believe or not, they should live together. separatism. he was always a victim. he knew more than anybody else
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that islam radical has nothing to do with islam and it kills muslims. >> francois hollande there. it's an occasion that puts a human face on the police doesn't it? and suitably reflects it french the flavor of france today. we have a young policewoman, we have an old-timer, if you like and we have a muslim. >> yeah. that was clearly what he wanted to bring out. it is symbolic. it's true. it wasn't a fluke that this -- the three victims came from these three different backgrounds. that is the reality. that was what the president pulled out from his address. he obviously had done his work and found out about the families and explored their stories and
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they are touching. they are very simple stories, particularly jean felipe a girl from the caribbean that came over and wanted to be a policewoman. she just finished graduation and gets gunned down in the back you know just outside the school. absolutely symbolic. you wouldn't get more symbolic of muslim in french life. a cheerful heroic young man who got on his bicycle, he's a patrolman and cycled toward the killers and was gunned down in that brutal fashion and the old-timer who had been around. he was the protection officer for the charlie hebdo team. they really really liked him. i was told by one of the team that survived they really --
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they were antipolice charlie hebdo, but they grew to love and respect him. he allowed them to work. without him, they would not be able to work. three very different stories. it allowed them to bring up the theme of sacrifice and the diversity of ordinary people and how ordinary people are involved in this. if you join this may be the sacrifice you have to make. >> it's a huge statesman's challenge isn't it for the president? we are looking atmore security measures to be put forward to the national assembly to parliament later in the day. also i noted he was keen to talk about the need to think and act clearly, serenely. >> yeah. the balance in the discourse is shifting. i mean of course that is on
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everyone's minds, the need to -- every moment, you know there has to be a reference to the muslim population and there's a risk of backlash. we have seen it. it's been in silly things small things incidents. nothing against human life, thankfully, so far. that has to be brought out. in the willingness of people to talk openly abdomen jihadism war. people are much -- and the president was more willing to talk openly about a threat in our midst. what has happened -- i think that's the big change from what happened. you know it's so stark, so clear now. you can't hide behind language of all. it is very very clear. there is an enemy and it is
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identified. >> thanks very much indeed. the pictures there in the prefecture in paris. i think we can move over to the scene in what is a tightly packed terrorist on the hill of northwest jerusalem now. simultaneously, the funerals have been under way for the four victims of the kosher supermarkets. those bodies were flown back over to jerusalem first thing this morning. this is the time at which the burial will take place after the funerals themselves for the man in his 20s, felipe a 45-year-old, another also in his 20s who worked in the supermarket and a man in his 60s. a man described as being in love
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with israel by a member of his family during the course of the funeral service a little earlier down the hill. there's the scenes in -- on the outskirts, i should say of jerusalem. >> our correspondent is there. she's been keeping across the story for us as well. >> reporter: we heard from a series of israeli religious and political leaders. among them the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu really emphasizing that israel was the real home of the juish people, a place where they could take sanctuary. we heard from the israeli president who spoke about how he, himself, stood broken hearted, shaken and in pain. with me stands an entire nation he said. he also talked about how he wished these four men could have
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come to israel alive. this was not how they were supposed to come home he said. of course these four men were not israeli citizens. they were french citizens and residents. an offer was made by the israeli foreign ministry to the families to be buried here in jerusalem. all of the families took up that offer. just a reminder of who the four men were a supermarket worker in his early 20s. another man in his early 20s, son of the chief rabbi of tunis, a student in paris and phillip, an i.t. executive in his 40s, a father of four and the oldest of them a retired father of two in his 60s. >> let's bring you up to date with the other stories around the world. a court in egypt overturned the
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conviction of former president, hosni mubarak and declared a retrial. this case was the only one left that kept him behind bars. he's been clear over the killings of protesters during the uprising in 2011. that was the point which he was toppled from power. our correspondent has been following developments from cairo. >> reporter: this ruling is another legal victory for e just a minute's former president, hosni mubarak. the conviction has been set aside. he was sentenced last may with his two sons convicted of embezzling funds allocated for resurrection of palaces. today in court whn the ruling was announced, his supporters were jubilant. they held posters of the
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president in his younger day. for now, he's been serving his sentence in a military hospital on the banks of the nile. his lawyer told bbc after the hearing when asked when he would be released he said god willing, god willing. no further detail has been provided. there was a report in a private newspaper suggesting the family would not try to have him released because they were concerned about providing security for him in a private residence. certainly the way is open for hosni mubarak to be a free man. in this very divided nation that's likely to provoke a reaction. >> pope francis has urged respect for human rights as he arrived on the island at the start of his asian tour. he said the nation can't fully heal from years of civil war without pursuing the abuse that took place. he was exposed to hot sun.
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pope francis postponed the meeting. our religious correspondent reports from columbia. >> after a long flight from rome pope francis arrived to sunshine and a warm greeting on the tarmac from sri lanka's president. >> your holiness -- friendship among our people after -- we are people who -- based on our sin there is just -- >> reporter: this is a nation that wants it future to be a harmonious one after conflict that ended just five years ago. for this audience the pope chose to speak in english about the needs to pursue the truth
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about what happened during that war. >> the process of healing also needs to include -- known for the sake of opening all eyes. as necessary means of justice, healing and unity. >> reporter: as the pope arrived, he said it was no easy task to overcome the injustice, hostility. he said it could be done but reconciliation, solidarity and peace. the pope's route was lined with enthusiastic crowds. many traveled miles to see him, calling it a once in a lifetime opportunity. >> it's very happy. i can't imagine that -- no words to say about that.
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>> the hope we are blessed. we hope we can have our problem solved this year. >> catholics make up less than 10% of the population they include the majority. today, with a visit of this pope, there is fresh hope after years of dispair that all can live in peace. bbc news columbo. it comes a few days after the new president took office. his predecessor has denyied attempting a coup to try to stay in power for his defeat at the ballot box. that was one of the stories during the rounds as it comes to a conclusion. with me is the editor of our service. let's move on slightly from that and focus on what the pope has said.
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human rights yes, okay. pursuit of the truth. is there reason to believe with the change of the presidential guard there will be more effort in terms of pursuit of the truth, whatever that might be? >> um yes. if you look at the camp during the run up to the election the farthest he would go is we would ensure transparent -- >> there's no suggestion of going further. >> mainly because any suggestion of cooperating with the international would talk nationalist fears. no president who comes to the office on the business of a singular route, of course they have come to the power of the office. more on the strength of minority
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than majority. still, he belongs to the majority and can't be openly -- majority. that's huge. >> given that he can represent a coalition of interests, political interests within sri lanka. i wonder if the pope's remarks would have been made with the past president, do you think there would be more inflammatory? >> that's a very interesting question. had he been in power, would the pope have made these remarks? i don't know. had he made the remarks, it would have been seen as an attempt to exert pressure on the president. if he was in office today. it would have certainly made more controversy, certainly. >> he himself, is a figure of
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huge reptitude. 10% of sri lanka is catholic. >> less than. he has a moral standing. pope is an international figure. whatever he says is followed in sri lanka with respect. >> thank you very much indeed. we hope you stay with us here on "bbc world news." more to bring you including after thousands join an antiislam march. angela merkel promotes tolerance.
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you are watching "bbc world news" with me, david eades. the latest headlines. the three police officers killed in the paris attacks have been given the highest award, the legion of honor. in israel funerals are being
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held for the victims of the supermarket killings in paris. the government says forces killed at least 143 bow ka hor am sollers. they said one was killed and four wounded during five hours of fighting close to the town of kolofata. they released a video threatening the president. the group killed thousands of people in northeastern nigeria. when does sensorship go too far? in china, it seems, it's when the most popular tv costume drama gets reedited to remove plunging necklines. we have the report. >> now it's probably the dramatic plot lines and the
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all-star cast that have made the empress of china such an overnight success. but the costumes? well, they might have helped a bit, too. until, that is the series mysteriously disappeared from chinese tv screens. four days later, though it was back but with almost every scene reframed cropped. an anti-cleavage campaign that sparked outrage. chinese scheduled with full of dramas precisely because they are considered id logically safe in a nation used to the harsh reality. this is considered a cut too far and it's being widely ridiculed online. china's army of internet users have been suggesting other subjects that might be right for a bit of reframing from the venus to vladimir putin in a
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mass mocking of the communist party. >> i hope the administrators realize they are making a fool of themselves. they might be to distracted to realize that. i think they should realize this kind of am bigty. they feel they are treated as children. >> reporter: for china's massive movie and tv industry it's a worrying sign that the government is requiring stricter controls as they clamp down on political decent. but, for the empress of china, the picture cropping has brought one benefit, publicity. it is still the most popular drama on chinese tv. now the german chancellor
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angela merkel is going to join a muslim rally to condemn attacks that took place last week. the weekly rally and we were there. >> reporter: they chant, we are the people. it was the slogan of 1989 when strict demonstrations brought down the curtain. they are trying to corrupt the people power of those heavy days. the threat is growing and growing, this man told me. i think it could happen here at anytime. events in france have galvanized
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the movement. pat tree yachtic yup pianos against the west. flags and placards displayed across europe. anti-immigration against islam. anti-e.u. and pro-russia. the marches faced opposition along the route. >> say it loud! say it clear! >> reporter: the police are coming in just in case. i will get down. testy exchanges going on here between the demonstrators over there and a noisy, testy, counter demonstration here. both sides are claiming to speak for the heart of the german nation. opponents labeled the march notazi
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nazi. more traditional, conservative center ground of german politics. >> they are telling us islam is peaceful. islam is not peaceful. they are an evil ideology to me. you know? >> reporter: do you think there's a place for islam in europe? >> if they integrate, but they don't. they just don't. >> reporter: do you think mainstream politicians are hearing your point of view? >> no they are ignoring it. >> reporter: you don't see many foreign faces on the streets. refugees from the islamic world make up fewer than a half percent. some are nervous. >> translator: we all worry. my sister wears a head scarf so now i have to pick her up from school. she is afraid really really afraid. >> reporter: overall, germany takes in more refugees than any other e.u. nation. the german political mainstream
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reacted to the rise by coming out strongly in defense of immigration. they came out in defense of immigrants tonight, too, noisily, but with smaller crowds. elsewhere in germany, counter demonstrations like these have for outnumbered the protesters. tonight, the street belonged to the right. that's gabriel reporting on what's being a regular weekly demonstration. i want to remind you of what has been the main story. that is the ceremonies taking place simultaneously in fact in both paris and jerusalem for seven of the victims of last week's terror attacks in paris. let me remind you, three french officers killed in the course of last week's attacks. they were awarded postmousily,
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france's highest honor during a service of honor that took place in the prefecture of the heart of paris. the legion of honor awarded by francois hollande. i'm going to leave you with the funeral in jerusalem for the four juish victims of the supermarket attack. ♪
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